How Praise Helps Make Your Kids Motivated and Develop Confidence?
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How Praise Helps Make Your Kids Motivated and Develop Confidence?

Praise can be a powerful form of encouragement. Even babies and toddlers benefit from the praise. In following article you are going to read about many research studis which reveal how praise can make your kids motivated and help them develop self confidence. These tips and techniques of using praise to develop positive skills can be adopted by parents and teachers. For instance, a study shows that moms who praise their preschoolers for their good manners have kids with better social skills. The phrases of praise make the kids motivated, confident, and inclined to tackle challenges. According to Bolton: Evaluative praise is the expression of favorable judgment about another person or his behaviors: "Eric, you are such a good boy." Evaluative praise often utilizes superlatives like "wonderful," "marvelous," "superb." and so on. This kind of praise, especially when it constitutes a favorable global evaluation of the person, is rarely constructive.

Praise can be a powerful form of encouragement. Even babies and toddlers benefit from the praise. In following article you are going to read about many research studis which reveal how praise can make your kids motivated and help them develop self confidence. These tips and techniques of using praise for skill development can be adopted by parents and teachers.

For instance, a study shows that moms who praise their preschoolers for their good manners have kids with better social skills. The phrases of praise make the kids motivated, confident, and inclined to tackle challenges.

Babies and toddlers benefit from praise that encourages them to explore on their own. In a study of 24-month old children, researchers watched how mothers responded to their toddlers while they attempted a challenging task. Then, these same families were invited back to the lab a year later and kids were tested again.

Researchers found that the 36-month old kids who were most likely to tackle challenges—and to persist at a task—were the ones whose mothers had praised and encouraged their independence at 24 months (Kelley et al 2000).

When you give a child descriptive praise, you don’t just tell him he’s doing well. You give him specific feedback, and you tell him something about your standards.                         

Praise serves a number of purposes.

  • It draws people together through an exchange of appreciation.
  • It can motivate people to greater achievement.
  • It tells people that they have performed well and/or improved over previous performance.
  • It observes examples of excellence that others may choose to follow. 

Sincere praise is a precious gift. When a friend, coworker, or loved one gives you praise or pays you a compliment, look that person in the eye and say "Thank You." Say it with true feelings of gratitude. You could even share how it feels to receive such a gift. Say something like "It feels good to be appreciated," or "I'm glad I could take part." You can respond adroitly to praise if you remember to do three things:

  1. Like yourself well enough to recognize when you do something well.
  2. Obtain validation from the inside and the outside.
  3. Treat praise like a gift. Say words of thanks and acknowledge the giver graciously and sincerely.

Jennifer Henderlong Corpus and Mark Lepper, psychologists who have analyzed over 30 years of studies on the effects of praise (Henderlong and Lepper 2002).

They determined that praise can be a powerful motivating force if you follow these guidelines:

• Be sincere and specific with your praise

• Praise kids only for traits they have the power to change

• Use descriptive praise that conveys realistic, attainable standards

• Be careful about praising kids for achievements that come easily

• Be careful about praising kids for doing what they already love to do

• Encourage kids to focus on mastering skills—not on comparing themselves to others

In addition, it’s important to be sensitive to your child’s developmental level.That's Incredible*

Useful links:

* The Effects of Person Versus Performance Praise on Children's

* 150 phrases you can use.

* The effects of praise: What scientific studies reveal about the right way to praise kids

* The Positive Effects of Praise

* The Art Of Paying Compliments

* Praise vs. Encouragement, Gratitude

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Comments (2)

Praise is positive feedback and positive feedback has always been a powerful motivator.

some good points here

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