The Effect of Peer Acceptance
Auto Beauty Business Culture Dieting DIY Events Fashion Finance Food Freelancing Gardening Health Hobbies Home Internet Jobs Law Local Media Men's Health Mobile Nutrition Parenting Pets Pregnancy Products Psychology Real Estate Relationships Science Seniors Sports Technology Travel Wellness Women's Health

The Effect of Peer Acceptance

Parents are not the only ones who affect a child's self-respect. Any person who spends long periods of time with him helps to determine his self-image. This person may be a relative, neighbor, babysitter, brother or sister. Teachers have a marked influence over a child because of their constant association. Even though the child is not as dependent on these people for his emotional needs as he is on his parents, they react continuously to him as a person and become an intimate part of his daily life.
 peer acceptance - social rule

Image Credit

Parents are not the only ones who affect a child's self-respect. Any person who spends long periods of time with him helps to determine his self-image. This person may be a relative, neighbor, babysitter, brother or sister. Teachers have a marked influence over a child because of their constant association. Even though the child is not as dependent on these people for his emotional needs as he is on his parents, they react continuously to him as a person and become an intimate part of his daily life.

About the age of 5, when a child begins school, he is no longer totally dependent on the family. He then finds that children outside his home value certain qualities. Boys place importance on sports, strength and courage. Girls usually value their physical appearance and personality. Whether or not the child has these qualities affects how he feels about himself.

Tall, strong, well coordinated Bart will feel differently about himself than his friend Leonard, who has a small, uncoordinated body. Leonard feels that he cannot offer what his friends want and, therefore, he sees himself as having less worth than Bart. Since all sports come easily to Bart, other children vie to have him on their teams, and parents and teachers take pride in his achievements. Hence Bart feels more adequate than Leonard.

A child reacts emotionally to his growth, energy, size, appearance, strength, intelligence, friendliness, skills and handicaps. He draws conclusions about himself, partly from his comparison of himself with others and partly how others respond to him. Each conclusion will add to or subtract from his feelings of self-worth. His successes in any given area will carry more weight if they are in areas he personally feels are important. A 12-year-old boy may be an accomplished pianist but a failure in football. However, playing the piano means little to him if his friends do not value it. Every activity that a child participates in gives him more information about himself. Clubs, sports, church groups, school, and work all add to his collection of self-descriptions and hence, identity formation.

Even under the best circumstances, people outside the family contribute to a youngster's feelings of unacceptance, but the more acceptance he finds from his family, the more rejection he can withstand from outside. Thus, although parents are not totally responsible for a child's self-concept, they play a major role, because how they relate to their child during the early years at home sets the stage for his later success or failure.

Looking for parenting resources? Save when shopping online by using the latet parenting resources coupons and pay less at popular retailers and brands. Find deals for popular parenting resources stores using community-sourced coupons and deals.
Need an answer?
Get insightful answers from community-recommended
experts
in Child Psychology on Knoji.
Would you recommend this author as an expert in Child Psychology?
You have 0 recommendations remaining to grant today.
Comments (1)

Good stuff.

ARTICLE DETAILS
RELATED ARTICLES
RELATED CATEGORIES
ARTICLE KEYWORDS